TechKnowLedge

**BACH -- Bay Area Consortium of Hackerspaces.** We're having our first unconference, a free event celebrating and cultivating
creative communities and hackerspaces in the San Francisco bay area.
Please come if you're in the area. October 11-12, at Sudo Room. Free Registration: http://2014.ba.chgrp.org/

From: Mitch Altman maltman23 at hotmail.com
Mon Sep 1 05:11:52 CEST 2014
Internet Archive Book Images on flickr
Internet Archive uploads more than 14 million public domain images to Flickr

mostlysignssomeportents:

Kalev Leetaru programatically recovered all the images that were discarded by the OCR program that digitizes the millions of public domain books scanned by the Archive; these were cropped, cleaned up, and uploaded to Flickr with the text that appears before and after them, and links to see their whole scanned page.

Read more…

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fight4future:

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On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s net neutrality comment deadline, internet users and tech companies will unite for the “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what’s at stake if we lose net neutrality, the “First Amendment of the Internet.”

wildcat2030:

Quantum state may be a real thingPhysicists summon up their courage and go after the nature of reality. - At the very heart of quantum mechanics lies a monster waiting to consume unwary minds. This monster goes by the name The Nature of Reality™. The greatest of physicists have taken one look into its mouth, saw the size of its teeth, and were consumed. Niels Bohr denied the existence of the monster after he nonchalantly (and very quietly) exited the monster’s lair muttering “shut up and calculate.” Einstein caught a glimpse of the teeth and fainted. He was reportedly rescued by Erwin Schrödinger at great personal risk, but neither really recovered from their encounter with the beast. The upshot is that we had a group of physicists and philosophers who didn’t believe that quantum mechanics represents reality but that it was all we could see of some deeper, more fundamental theory. A subclass of these scientists believed that the randomness of quantum mechanics would eventually be explained by some non-random, deterministic property that we simply couldn’t directly observe (otherwise known as a hidden variable). Another group ended up believing that quantum mechanics did represent reality, and that, yes, reality was non-local, and possibly not very real either. To one extent or another, these two groups are still around and still generate a fair amount of heat when they are in proximity to each other. Over the years, you would have to say that the scales have been slowly tipping in favor of the latter group. Experiments and theory have largely eliminated hidden variables. Bohm’s pilot wave, a type of hidden variable, has to be pretty extraordinary to be real. This has left us with more refined arguments to settle. One of these is about whether the wave function represents reality or just an observer’s view of reality. (via Quantum state may be a real thing | Ars Technica)

wildcat2030:

Quantum state may be a real thing
Physicists summon up their courage and go after the nature of reality.
-
At the very heart of quantum mechanics lies a monster waiting to consume unwary minds. This monster goes by the name The Nature of Reality™. The greatest of physicists have taken one look into its mouth, saw the size of its teeth, and were consumed. Niels Bohr denied the existence of the monster after he nonchalantly (and very quietly) exited the monster’s lair muttering “shut up and calculate.” Einstein caught a glimpse of the teeth and fainted. He was reportedly rescued by Erwin Schrödinger at great personal risk, but neither really recovered from their encounter with the beast. The upshot is that we had a group of physicists and philosophers who didn’t believe that quantum mechanics represents reality but that it was all we could see of some deeper, more fundamental theory. A subclass of these scientists believed that the randomness of quantum mechanics would eventually be explained by some non-random, deterministic property that we simply couldn’t directly observe (otherwise known as a hidden variable). Another group ended up believing that quantum mechanics did represent reality, and that, yes, reality was non-local, and possibly not very real either. To one extent or another, these two groups are still around and still generate a fair amount of heat when they are in proximity to each other. Over the years, you would have to say that the scales have been slowly tipping in favor of the latter group. Experiments and theory have largely eliminated hidden variables. Bohm’s pilot wave, a type of hidden variable, has to be pretty extraordinary to be real.
This has left us with more refined arguments to settle. One of these is about whether the wave function represents reality or just an observer’s view of reality. (via Quantum state may be a real thing | Ars Technica)

asapscience:

All three volumes of The Feynman Lectures on Physics are now available for FREE online! (You’re welcome.) 

“I usually don’t share the really scary stuff,” Sarkeesian wrote on a post accompanying the image. “But it’s important for folks to know how bad it gets.”

Adversarial Compatibility: hidden escape hatch rescues us from imprisonment through our stuff (please reblog!)

mostlysignssomeportents:

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My latest Guardian column, Adapting gadgets to our needs is the secret pivot on which technology turns, explains the hidden economics of stuff, and how different rules can trap you in your own past, or give you a better future.

Read more…

3D printed bump keys make short work of high-security locks

mostlysignssomeportents:

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High-end locks rely on their unique key-shapes to prevent “bumping” (opening a lock by inserting a key-blank and hitting it with a hammer, causing the pins to fly up), but you can make a template for a bump key by photographing the keyhole and modelling it in software.

Read more…